Streaming Links

Day 1 – MONDAY, APRIL 11

9:00am-10:30am: Welcoming Introductions 


Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom – Livestream Link
Welcome to YIMBYtown! Welcome to Portland State University! And welcome to the Pacific Northwest.

10:45am-12:00pm: Breakout Sessions


What do Housing Providers Have to Say About Zoning Reform and City Policies? – Livestream Link
Room 294

YIMBYs talk frequently about the benefits that zoning reform can bring towards increasing the supply of new market-rate housing, but affordable housing providers are also greatly impacted by municipal and statewide changes to housing policy, too. This panel interviews three housing providers about how Portland’s and Oregon’s zoning reforms will change the housing they build and speak about how to further collaborate with abundant housing advocates to maximize the number of homes they can provide to those in need.


Inclusionary Housing: A dial, not a switch – Livestream Link
Room 296

For almost two decades, Oregon’s cities were prohibited from using inclusionary housing as part of their toolkit to encourage new housing for people living on low-to-moderate incomes. What was the intent behind lifting this ban in 2016? Wat have we learned? How do we move forward? During this session, we have brought together those who initiated its inception and those who are tracking its progress so we can get past the hot takes for a solutions-focused conversation.


Cultivating Business Leadership for Abundant and Equitable Housing:
Presented by Business for a Better Portland – Livestream Link
Room 327
How can housing advocates build relationships with business leaders to support a larger agenda of housing abundance? In an era in which municipal politics are often dominated by corporate-interests, civic leaders willing to speak out about the importance of proactive investment in equitable housing practices are a critical asset in the larger campaign to implement progressive policies for housing abundance and climate action. This panel features three Portland-based civic leaders who have used their positions as entrepreneurs to advocate for housing justice and transportation improvements for better urban form, and provides an opportunity for advocates to learn more about how to cultivate small business leadership in their own communities.


More Trees for More Neighbors – Livestream Link
Room 328
We love our urban tree canopy, and we love more neighbors. How do we ensure all neighborhoods—across income, race, and geography—can enjoy the benefits of greenscape and residential infill?

12:15pm-1:15pm: Lunch Keynote


Housing Abundance Requires Abundant Transportation – Livestream Link
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom

What do advocates for fair and abundant housing have in common with advocates for fair and abundant transportation, and how can they better collaborate to advocate for the neighborhoods we want? Four practitioners, advocates, and organizers break down why land use and transportation are so intertwined and what that means for the work ahead.

1:30pm-2:30pm: Breakout Sessions


What’s Happening in the Federal Government? A presentation by Up For Growth – Livestream Link
Room 294

What do advocates for fair and abundant housing have in common with advocates for fair and abundant transportation, and how can they better collaborate to advocate for the neighborhoods we want? Four practitioners, advocates, and organizers break down why land use and transportation are so intertwined and what that means for the work ahead.


Tenants Rights In Our Backyard – And Tenants In Our Coalition, Too – Livestream Link
Room 296
While there might be minor policy disagreements on the margins, the concepts of achieving housing justice by fighting for more homes to be built fighting for stronger tenant protections aren’t inherently contradictory. There’s clearly work to do, however, to organize at the speed of trust and find opportunities for common ground and build durable, broad coalitions for housing justice that pit YIMBYs and tenants not against each other but instead in collaboration against housing precarity and scarcity. This panel features speakers who have worked on numerous campaigns for renters’ rights to discuss successes and failures of building these coalitions, as well as charting a path forward for stronger alliances towards housing stability justice for everyone in our communities,


You’re a YIMBY? Great, Why Aren’t You a Small Developer Yet? – Livestream Link
Room 328

After all these great pro-housing policies get passed, who is going to do the actual implementation of these building types in your community? Large-scale developers are not yet lining up to build triplexes and basement apartments in your neighborhoods. Come hear stories from advocates who decided they’d roll up their sleeves and add the housing and neighborhood amenities they wanted to see themselves. This presentation will also give an introduction to the basics of small scale infill development.


Land Use Policy is Climate Policy is Housing Policy – Livestream Link
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom
Research says that to build low-carbon neighborhoods, we need to plan for regions filled with dense, walkable communities comprised of abundant and affordable housing connected by frequent and reliable transit. But how do we get there, and what role can abundant housing advocates play in coordinating with transit and climate advocates to spur these changes? This panel features the latest research on the significant of smart land use policy and advice from advocates on how to make the housing/transportation link more durable.

2:45pm-4:00pm: Breakout sessions


The Future of Historic Preservation – Livestream Link
Room 294
Is the role of historic preservation to memorialize loss, or does it have an active role in building something different? What is the distinctive role of historic preservation in moving forward? Whatever your definition of these terms, you will be invited to hold them lightly during this conversation.


Developers Sound Off: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities to Build All This Dang Housing – Livestream Link
Room 296

With legislation for missing middle housing rapidly sweeping the country, who is stepping up to build the duplexes, triplexes, and fourplexes that are now relegalized for America’s urban cores? This panel features developers currently building these new missing middle housing who will provide their perspective on how these new laws are and aren’t streamlining the construction of new places to live.


Keeping Our Neighbors Housed – Livestream Link
Room 328
The crisis of homelessness dominates so many aspects of municipal politics here in Portland and other cities with a massive affordable housing shortage, and many crucial initiatives are currently susceptible to a growing, coordinated revanchist political revolt . How can advocates for abundant housing show up in these spaces to support advocates in their work of getting everyone housed, and also fight off the grumps more concerned that they have to see poverty and suffering than the fact such injustice exists in the first place? This panel provides speakers who will discuss the ongoing struggle to implement proven, humane policy solutions and what role YIMBYs can play in shifting the narrative about housing policy.


Equitable Schools Demand Equitable Neighborhoods – Livestream Link
Room 329

Abundant housing advocates propose sweeping changes to zoning codes to hack away at segregation; education advocates have been attempting to integrate public schools for decades with at best a mixed record of success. Schools are the social center and bedrock of a neighborhood, and decisions about school boundaries are often at least as contentious as those of zoning, especially along lines of race and class. This panel features education and housing advocates to discuss the role public schools play in the future of upzoned urban neighborhoods and what YIMBYs should know as they work for housing affordability and social integration.


Winning Abundant Housing: Japan & New Zealand – Livestream Link
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom
Not every country suffers from acute housing shortages, spiraling prices, displacement, and the rest of the NIMBY nightmare. In this session, we’ll hear – via Zoom from Tokyo and Auckland – from leading observers about two fascinating places. Japan has the most affordable and stable home prices and rents in the industrial world. What’s the story? And New Zealand has recently adopted one of the most sweeping upzones in the world. How did it accomplish that? Lessons from afar for YIMBYtown!


Day 2 – TUESDAY, APRIL 12

 

9:00am-10:30am: Breakout Sessions


Fighting the Freeway Industrial Complex and What It Means for Housing
Room 294

Reducing urban car dependency is a necessary and integral initiative to making housing more affordable, neighborhoods more healthy, and lowering our emissions. Yet American transportation policy overwhelmingly continues to spend billions on freeways. How are transportation, climate, and housing advocates working to stymie the freeway industrial complex and what does it mean for the movement for abundant housing?


Building Healthy Organizations and Sustainable Movements
Room 296

How do you create an advocacy organization that is inclusive, welcoming, and focused? How do you avoid burnout from staff and board members? How do you turn a small slack channel’s worth of housing advocates into a powerhouse organization shifting public policy at the city- and state-level? These aren’t easy questions to answer, but they are certainly the questions asked of anyone interested in building an organization. This panel features three leaders who have held leadership positions in numerous social movements, political campaigns and nonprofit organizations, where they will speak on the lessons learned to make sure our efforts support long term success.


What Does It Take To Pass Statewide Zoning Reform?
Room 328

While the YIMBY movement got its start shooting spitballs at neighborhood associations and municipal governments, the last few years have seen housing advocates wil gamechanging legislation passed through their state capitols. Oregon’s HB 2001 in 2019 and California’s passage of SB 9 last fall represent a whole new path forward for proactive zoning reform to relegalize missing middle housing. This panel features three housing advocates from West Coast states sharing their perspectives on the key ingredients necessary for statewide victories, and how these campaigns differ from the municipal advocacy in terms of strategy, community engagement and messaging. Also, let’s celebrate these monumental victories!


Gender, Sexuality and Abundant Housing
Room 329

Cities have historically always been sanctuary for the queer community. Yet as American sexuality and gender roles have expanded and evolved, our housing paradigms have not, and the LGBTQ population suffers from higher rates of housing precarity on every metric. How can zoning codes and housing policy more broadly make a community more inclusive, welcoming and affordable? This panel will acknowledge the ways that the norms of “single family homes” mirror the norms of heteronormativity, and more broadly touch on the need for further overlap and collaboration between LGBTQ+ advocates and those for abundant and affordable housing.


Winning Abundant Housing: UK, Germany, and France
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom
Not every country suffers from acute housing shortages, spiraling prices, displacement, and the rest of the NIMBY nightmare. In this session, we’ll hear – via Zoom from Europe – from leading observers about three fascinating places. Germany has among the affordable and stable home prices and rents in the industrial world. What’s the story? Paris was in a full-on housing crisis and then it started building enormous amounts of housing. How did that happen? And the UK recently adopted an intriguing new approach to housing reform: what is it and how will it work? Lessons from afar for YIMBYtown!

10:45am-12:00pm: Breakout Sessions

 


Showing up for All Our Neighbors: YIMBY and Houselessness
Room 294

While YIMBYs often are advocating for changes that take years to implement, other housing advocates are working on changes for individuals on the streets tonight. How can advocates for abundant housing leverage their organization’s power and resources to ensure that everyone has a warm and dry place to sleep at night? How does undersupply of housing impact a region’s homeless population? This panel explores the successes and challenges of how these conversations have played out in Portland, the lessons learned from efforts to pass Portland’s Shelter to Housing Continuum, and the moral and political reasons to build stronger ties between these overlapping initiatives.


Telling Stories and Building Narrative in a Distracted World
Room 296

The media landscape around urban housing policy is awfully noisy these days, and it’s not getting any easier to connect with distracted, overwhelmed audiences. It’s enormously difficult to translate communicate complicated white papers about zoning in simple, concrete terms that advance a progressive urban agenda and persuade the public to support urban infill. This panel features four individuals who have successfully crafted narratives around housing and climate policy at local, state and national levels of advocacy through a wide variety of media strategies, from illustrations to op-eds, earning media from national publications to training teenage activists to organize through effective tiktok videos.


Celebrating and Dissecting Municipal Victories for Abundant Housing
Room 328
All politics are local – and nowhere is that more apparent than in campaigns to reform city zoning code to relegalize missing middle housing. How are local abundant housing advocates building coalitions with other housing advocates, negoitating the halls of their local city hall, and finding the votes necessary for zoning reform? Who are the power brokers that truly made a difference in passing local zoning reforms, and what lessons were learned that advocates in other cities should hear as they gear up for a campaign? This panel features three individuals with front row seats to their efforts to address their cities housing shortage by reform, and will host a discussion about the best practices to building sustainable, durable coalitions for further successes for abundant housing.


From Highways to Homes: The opportunity to reconnect communities divided by freeways – Hosted by Congress for New Urbanism
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom
At its peak, federal highway construction demolished 37,000 homes a year to make way for roads. Over 1 million Americans, a significant proportion of them people of color, displaced from their neighborhoods. Millions more left living next to a highway, subject to its noxious effects. Highway building is a housing crisis. Can dismantling highways help alleviate this crisis and repair the communities they split? An increasing number of American cities see replacing highways with connected neighborhoods as an opportunity for both economic and community development. Learn with our freeway fighting panelists as we discuss the different paths for cities to build whole neighborhoods out of former highway corridors and create reparative programs that sustain and support existing communities.

12:15pm-1:30pm: Lunchtime Keynote


Political Leadership for Abundant Housing
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom

Elected officials spend most of their time listening to us gripe about housing – in this panel, the tables are turned, and we’ll hear from three public officials who will share their experiences and lessons learned from advocating for housing justice. This panel interviews three champions of housing justice who have championed various initiatives relating to housing abundance, tenant protections, and addressing homelessness. We’ll learn how these three policymakers picked up an interest in zoning as well as how organizers and advocates can better support efforts for successful policy victories, as well as hear their lessons learned for future initiatives.

1:45pm-3:00pm: Breakout sessions


Parking Reform: From theory to practice
Room 294

It wouldn’t be YIMBYtown if we didn’t at least one panel to talk about the high cost of free parking. The principles of Donald Shoup have never been more popular; advocates, elected officials, and policymakers are each looking at reform to car parking policies as an essential task to increase housing abundance, reduce carbon emissions, and just overall make cities more pleasant. This panel features case studies and best practices of how municipal transportation and housing advocates have worked together to implement substantial overhauls on parking policy.


Turning Environmentalists into Housing Advocates
Room 296

We all understand that housing policy is climate policy – well, all of us at YIMBYtown, anyway. How do we work with existing environmental organizations to build interest and support for policies that simultaneously support housing abundance and low-carbon communities? This panel shares success stories of collaborating with and empowering environmental- and climate- minded organizations to become allies and even accomplices in the effort to build more sustainable and equitable neighborhoods.


West Coast Case Studies: Advocacy for and Implementation of Legislation for Regional Housing Needs
Room 327
Oregon, Washington and California each have laws on the books to mandate that municipalities explicitly plan for and make space for new housing. Yet implementation is tricky, and advocates are continuing to work with policymakers to close loopholes and ensure that every community is taking on their appropriate share of new growth to alleviate the housing crisis across the West Coast. This panel features advocates, policymakers, and researchers to compare and contrast each state’s approach to regional housing allocation and discuss opportunities for future policy improvements.


Abundant Housing Requires Abundant Democracy
Room 328

Who decides what housing gets built, and for whom? How do our electoral systems intersect with housing policy at the local and state levels? For this panel, we welcome a board member for Portland: Neighbors Welcome who also serves on Portland’s Charter Commission, and a researcher with Sightline who covers Democracy and Housing from Anchorage, Alaska

3:15pm-4:15pm: Breakout Sessions


The Present and Future of ADUs and Other Homes In Our Backyards
Room 294

Wait, what are we *actually* trying to build in our backyards? From cottage clusters to tiny houses on wheels, as well as all sorts of new streamlined ways to build ADUs, recent legislation passing in states across the country have given developers the go-ahead to find new ways to provide affordable housing solutions to help address our housing crisis. This panel features four professionals with experience navigating the policies to build new accessory dwelling units and other innovative new forms of urban infill housing.


Community Land Trusts In Our Backyards
Room 328

What role does the establishment of community land trust play in the movement for more abundant housing? How can community land trust play an essential role in providing homes for folks not served by traditional market-rate housing, and what role do they play in stabilizing a community undergoing gentrification and displacement? This panel speaks to two Pacific Northwest leaders about how advocacy for housing abundance and community land trusts go hand-in-hand.


Social Housing In Our Backyards
Smith Memorial Student Ballroom

Just as public libraries offer a great compliment to small bookstores to ensure that everyone has access to books, YIMBYs are increasingly embracing how social housing can play an invaluable role ålleviating a tight housing market and providing an alternative to traditional private-sector landlords for renters struggling with housing scarcity. This panel features two advocates leading West Coast campaigns for social housing, and explores the ways in which abundant housing advocates can join the efforts to make social housing not just a pipe dream but in fact reality in cities across the country.

4:30pm-5:45pm: Afternoon Keynote


Thumb on the Scale: Our housing systems and how to fix them
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom
How can our housing systems both be broken and be working exactly as designed? How do we move with intention to disrupt the patterns that are polarizing access to opportunity?

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